Read: Return on investment: a novel by Magdalena Waz

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Return on investment is a ridiculous-ly good debut novel by Magdalena Waz. Equal measures of satire and thoughtfulness make this story a fun and captivating quick read.

Laurie, the central character, is one of many millennials living in Chicago, trying to makes ends meet while paying back student loans from college. The story revolves around her and her friends, questioning their current job choices and wondering about the hazy future. Laurie tries self-employed schemes, allowing her ambitions of setting her own minimal hours while maximizing profits to rule over logic and practicality. She does her friends into her latest endeavor and everyone is changed by their experiences.

Waz takes bold ideas, such as a job as a human breast pump (Laurie’s initial job attempt), and turns them into reality within the pages of the novel. As ridiculous as it sounds, she grounds it in detail and seriousness that the reader believes that such a job exists and has demand, at least for a while, in the Chicago of the story. Due to this strong growth grounding, the reader is able to believe the characters and premise of the novel.

The characters themselves also have depth and specifics that give them dimensions. Even with Laurie, she is complex and feels like a real person. They are all relatable to some extent, no matter what you think of their actions and personalities.

The format of the book is not usually something that I am a fan of but Waz uses it to her advantage and it really suits her story. The book itself is the length of a novel and each short chapter rotates between one of the four characters, with the exceptional n being one chapter for the party with all of them. Mark, Laurie’s boyfriend, is the only one who doesn’t get separate chapters since he’s mostly included in Laurie’s sections and he’s more stable in his job choice than the others. Of all of them, he doesn’t understand Laurie’s need for a non-standard, non-9-to-5 job. Due to the sections being so intertwined, and becoming even more so as the story progresses, they fit together as a novel instead of potentially being disjointed more as short stories with a tenuous connection.

Also, it’s fun to read a book written by a fellow classmate from undergrad. We both attended Lawrence University and overlapped for a couple of years.

Recommended?: Yes! It’s fast, funny read like no other. While satirical, there are thought-provoking moments as each character struggles with living their adult life, trying to make they own way in the world. As a satire, it isn’t a handbook for understanding Millennials, but it does offer some insights here and there throughout. I can’t wait to see what’s next for Waz!

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